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Effect of postoperative partial bladder filling after minimally invasive hysterectomy on postanesthesia care unit discharge and cost: a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial

Published:January 09, 2019DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2018.12.034

      Background

      Hysterectomy is one of the most common surgical procedures performed each year with substantial related health care costs. This trial studied the effect of postoperative bladder backfilling to submicturition level in the operating room and its effect on early postoperative patient care and related cost.

      Objective

      The objective of the study was to compare the effect of bladder backfilling on early postoperative patient care and related cost.

      Study Design

      This was a randomized, single-blinded, controlled trial conducted between April 2016 and February 2017 at a single urban university hospital providing tertiary care for minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Ninety-one patients undergoing straight-stick laparoscopic and robot-assisted hysterectomy by minimally invasive gynecologic surgeons for benign indications were recruited. The bladder was partially backfilled with 150 mL of normal saline postoperatively in the intervention group and drained in the control group, as per standard of care. Main outcomes studied were time needed to void, time spent in the postanesthesia care unit, and postanesthesia care unit cost after minimally invasive hysterectomy. Our secondary outcomes were postoperative complications.

      Results

      Forty-six patients (50.5%) were randomized to the intervention group, and 45 patients (49.5%) to the control group. Baseline comparative analysis of demographics and preoperative patient-specific variables, surgical history, intraoperative characteristics, and administered medications found the 2 groups to be largely homogenous. After regression analyses for adjustment, we found a significant reduction in the time needed to void, time spent in the postanesthesia care unit, and postanesthesia care unit–associated cost in the intervention group. Patients voided 64.9 minutes earlier than the control group (P = .015) ans spent 64 fewer minutes in the postanesthesia care unit (P = .006), resulting in $401.5 (USD) saving per patient (P = .006). None of the patients encountered any postoperative complications.

      Conclusion

      Based on the findings of this randomized clinical trial, postoperative bladder backfilling to submicturition level shortens the time needed for patients to void in the postanesthesia care unit, resulting in shorter postanesthesia care unit stay and resultant cost savings. Conservatively projecting our findings on minimally invasive hysterectomy procedure is estimated to result in $69 million to $139 million (USD) per year in savings. Initiating similar investigations in other ambulatory surgical fields will likely result in a more substantial impact.

      Key words

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