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  • Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM), SMFM Publications Committee
Published:August 14, 2015DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2015.08.024
      Thank you for your letter and interest regarding the recent Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Consult #36: prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA (cfDNA).
      Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Publications Committee
      Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Consult Series #36: prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA.
      We wholeheartedly agree that clear and comprehensive information and education are needed regarding the implementation of these tests into clinical practice.
      We further agree that test accuracy is a metric of limited clinical value and that positive predictive value is the key to interpretation of post-test risk after cfDNA aneuploidy screening.
      To assist providers in counseling their patients, the Perinatal Quality Foundation and the National Society for Genetic Counselors now provide access to an on-line positive predictive value calculator that is available for general use (https://www.perinatalquality.org/Vendors/NSGC/NIPT/).
      We hope that such tools will help facilitate improved quality of care with enhanced patient and provider understanding of cfDNA aneuploidy screening performance.

      Reference

        • Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Publications Committee
        Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) Consult Series #36: prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA.
        Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2015; 212: 711-716

      Linked Article

      • Prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA
        American Journal of Obstetrics & GynecologyVol. 213Issue 6
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          We sincerely thank the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Publication Committee for its recent article that addressed noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT).1 The document provides invaluable information and guidance for practitioners. A concept that was not addressed was test accuracy, which is itself a discrete measure of screening test validity. Accuracy is particularly important with regard to NIPT because commercial laboratories that offer these tests often advertise them as “>99% accurate”2 but provide no further explanation of how this figure is derived or what it means.
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