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Survival differences in women with serous tubal, ovarian, peritoneal, and uterine carcinomas

  • Irina Usach
    Affiliations
    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Kevin Blansit
    Affiliations
    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA

    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific & Palo Alto Medical Foundation Sutter Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA
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  • Lee May Chen
    Affiliations
    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Stefanie Ueda
    Affiliations
    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Rebecca Brooks
    Affiliations
    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Daniel S. Kapp
    Affiliations
    Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford Cancer Center, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
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  • John K. Chan
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author: John K. Chan, MD.
    Affiliations
    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA

    Division of Gynecologic Oncology, California Pacific & Palo Alto Medical Foundation Sutter Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA
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Published:August 18, 2014DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2014.08.016

      Objective

      The fallopian tube has been implicated as the primary origin of pelvic serous cancers. We proposed to determine the survival outcomes of serous tubal, ovarian, peritoneal, and uterine cancer patients.

      Study Design

      Data were obtained from the National Cancer Institute between 2004 and 2009. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis.

      Results

      Of 12,336 high-grade serous cancer patients, 563 were tubal (TC), 8560 ovarian (OC), 1037 primary peritoneal (PPC), and 2176 uterine cancer (USC). The median ages of these patients were 63 vs 62 vs 67 vs 68 years, respectively. The majority were white (89% vs 88% vs 91% vs 74%). The overall 5 year, disease-specific survival was 37%. The survivals of those with TC, OC, PPC, and USC were 50%, 37%, 26%, and 40% (P < .01). There was no detailed staging on PPC cancers. Adjusted for stage, the survival of those with stage I, II, III, and IV TC were 73%, 62%, 44%, and 22% (P < .01), OC were 83%, 64%, 34%, and 15% (P < .01), and USC were 88%, 72%, 55%, and 17% (P < .01). On multivariate analysis, younger age, white race, earlier stage, and tubal origin were independent predictors for improved survival.

      Conclusion

      In advanced-staged serous cancer patients, tubal cancer patients have better survivals compared with ovarian, peritoneal, and uterine cancer.

      Key words

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