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Poster session I Clinical obstetrics, epidemiology, fetus, medical-surgical complications, neonatalogy, physiology/endocrinology, prematurity: Abstracts 87 - 236| Volume 208, ISSUE 1, SUPPLEMENT , S66, January 01, 2013

125: Adverse outcomes of teenage pregnancies

      Objective

      Data on pregnancy outcomes of teenage women who deliver are limited. Given pelvic immaturity, there is concern for adverse events. The objective of this study was to compare pregnancy outcomes of women <18 years of age to those ≥18 years of age.

      Study Design

      This was a retrospective cohort study of all consecutive women who underwent labor between 2004 and 2008. Pregnancy outcomes including vaginal laceration, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), shoulder dystocia, umbilical cord gas pH <7.2 or <7.05, and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission in women <18 years of age were compared to women ≥18. A second analysis comparing only term deliveries was performed. Exclusion criteria included multiple gestations and congenital anomalies. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed; logistic regression analyses were used to adjust for confounders.

      Results

      Of 8,390 women, 663 were <18 years of age. After adjusting for nulliparity, African American race, gestational hypertension, prior cesarean, and birthweight >4000 grams teen women were at an increased risk of vaginal laceration (aOR 1.59, CI 1.33-1.89), but there was no difference in postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, umbilical cord gas pH <7.2 or pH <7.05, or NICU admission. There were 5,386 women who delivered at term, 500 were teenage women. After adjusting for nulliparity, African American race, gestational hypertension, gestational diabetes, prior cesarean, or birthweight >4000 grams there was no difference in laceration, postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, umbilical cord gas pH <7.20 or pH <7.05.

      Conclusion

      Our results suggest, while the teenage pelvis may not be mature, risks of postpartum hemorrhage, shoulder dystocia, abnormal umbilical cord gases, or NICU admission are similar when comparing women <18 years of age and those ≥18 years of age. There is, however, an increased risk of vaginal laceration in teenage women.
      Tabled 1Outcomes of teenage pregnancies: all deliveries
      Table thumbnail grr28