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Maternal exposure to moderate ambient carbon monoxide is associated with decreased risk of preeclampsia

  • Desheng Zhai
    Affiliations
    School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China

    Department of Public Health, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, Henan, People's Republic of China

    OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, ON, Canada

    Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
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  • Yanfang Guo
    Affiliations
    OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, ON, Canada

    Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
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  • Graeme Smith
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queen's Perinatal Research Unit, Kingston General Hospital, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada
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  • Daniel Krewski
    Affiliations
    McLaughlin Centre for Population Health Risk Assessment, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
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  • Mark Walker
    Affiliations
    OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, ON, Canada

    Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, ON, Canada

    Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
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  • Shi Wu Wen
    Correspondence
    Reprints: Shi Wu Wen, PhD, OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Faculty of Medicine, 501 Smyth Rd., Box 241, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6
    Affiliations
    School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan, People's Republic of China

    OMNI Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, ON, Canada

    Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine, University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine, ON, Canada

    Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
    Search for articles by this author
Published:March 30, 2012DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2012.03.022

      Objective

      Carbon monoxide (CO) in cigarette smoke may be the mechanism by which tobacco use during pregnancy decreases the risk of the development of preeclampsia. We attempted to test this hypothesis by examining the effect of maternal exposure to ambient CO on preeclampsia.

      Study Design

      Births that occurred between 2004 and 2009 in the Canadian province of Ontario were extracted from the data. Study subjects were divided into 4 groups according to quartiles of CO concentration that were based on maternal residence. Adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were used to estimate the independent effect of CO on preeclampsia.

      Results

      Rates of preeclampsia were 2.32%, 1.97%, 1.59%, and 1.26%, respectively, in the first, second, third, and fourth quartile of CO concentration. The inverse association between CO concentration and preeclampsia risk remained the same after adjustment for several important confounding factors.

      Conclusion

      Maternal exposure to moderate ambient CO is associated independently with a decreased risk of preeclampsia.

      Key words

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