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Do patient goals vary with stage of prolapse?

      Objectives

      To assess the relationship between stage of pelvic organ prolapse and self-expressed patient goals at initial urogynecologic evaluation.

      Study Design

      From February to December of 2010, women presenting for evaluation of pelvic floor disorders were asked to identify up to 5 goals for treatment. Charts were reviewed for demographics. Patients were grouped according to stage of prolapse and goals were grouped into 9 categories.

      Results

      Two hundred twenty-six women completed the questionnaire. Relief of urinary symptoms were the most commonly stated goal regardless of prolapse stage, pelvic organ prolapse quantitative-0 (59%), pelvic organ prolapse quantitative-I (78%), pelvic organ prolapse quantitative-II (55%), and pelvic organ prolapse quantitative-III (58%). Lifestyle, daily activity, and sexual function goals were the second, third, and fourth most common goals in all stages, respectively.

      Conclusion

      Resolution of urinary symptoms, ability to perform daily activities, and sexual function goals are at least as important as resolution of prolapse symptoms and may be the reason for seeking care.

      Key words

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