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Physical activity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: prevalence, predictors, and positive health associations

  • Julie D. Lamb
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Erica B. Johnstone
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Julie-Anne Rousseau
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Christopher L. Jones
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Lauri A. Pasch
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Marcelle I. Cedars
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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  • Heather G. Huddleston
    Correspondence
    Reprints: Heather G. Huddleston, MD, 2356 Sutter St., 7th Floor, San Francisco, CA 94115
    Affiliations
    Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
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Published:February 03, 2011DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2010.12.006

      Objective

      The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence and predictors of physical activity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and to explore the potential health benefits that are associated with physical activity in this population.

      Study Design

      This was a cross-sectional assessment of 150 women with PCOS. Active women (those who met Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS] guidelines for exercise) were compared with inactive women with regards to demographic and psychosocial variables and health characteristics.

      Results

      Fifty-nine percent (88/150 women) met the DHHS guidelines for physical activity. Active women were more likely than inactive women to be nulliparous (64.1% vs 40.0%; P = .04) and white (71.6% vs 42.6%; P = .0004). Inactive women were more likely to have mild depression (adjusted odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–4.79; P = .048).

      Conclusion

      Women with PCOS who met the DHHS guidelines for physical activity were more likely to enjoy a variety of health benefits. Our findings identify several groups that are at risk for inadequate physical activity.

      Key words

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