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Coffee consumption and risk of breast cancer: a metaanalysis

Published:December 29, 2008DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2008.10.019

      Objective

      This metaanalysis was conducted to assess the association between coffee consumption and breast cancer risk.

      Study Design

      Relevant studies were identified by searching Medline (1966-May 2008) and the reference lists of retrieved articles. The summary relative risk (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated using a random-effects model.

      Results

      Nine cohort and 9 case-control studies met the inclusion criteria. The combined RR showed a borderline significant influence of highest coffee consumption (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90-1.00) or an increment of 2 cups/day of coffee consumption (RR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-1.00) on the risk of breast cancer. In stratified analysis, borderline significant associations were observed among cohort and case-control studies and studies conducted in Europe and the United States. However, no significant association was noted among studies conducted in Asia.

      Conclusion

      Our findings suggest a possible influence of high coffee consumption or an increased coffee consumption on the risk of breast cancer.

      Key words

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