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Postmenopausal hormone therapy and incident urinary incontinence in middle-aged women

  • Mary K. Townsend
    Correspondence
    Reprints: Mary Townsend, ScD, Channing Laboratory, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115
    Affiliations
    Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
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  • Gary C. Curhan
    Affiliations
    Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    Renal Division, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
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  • Neil M. Resnick
    Affiliations
    Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA
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  • Francine Grodstein
    Affiliations
    Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

    Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA
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Published:November 19, 2008DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2008.08.009

      Objective

      The objective of the study was to examine the association of hormone therapy with incident urinary incontinence (UI) in postmenopausal women aged 37-54 years in the Nurses' Health Study II.

      Study Design

      Participants reported use of hormone therapy, including hormone type, on biennial questionnaires from 1989 to 2001. Among 7341 postmenopausal women reporting no UI in 2001, we identified 1026 women who developed UI at least monthly between 2001 and 2003. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

      Results

      Women currently using hormone therapy had 1.39-fold (95% CI, 1.16-1.67) increased odds of incident UI, compared with women who never used hormone therapy. ORs were similar in current users of oral estrogen alone (OR, 1.35, 95% CI, 1.03-1.78) and oral estrogen with progestin (OR, 1.37, 95% CI, 1.13-1.67).

      Conclusion

      These findings suggest an increased risk of UI associated with use of postmenopausal hormone therapy in younger postmenopausal women.

      Key words

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