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Obesity and outcomes after sacrocolpopexy

Published:October 10, 2008DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2008.07.030

      Objective

      The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes after sacrocolpopexy (SC) between obese and healthy-weight women.

      Study Design

      Baseline and postoperative data were analyzed from the Colpopexy And Urinary Reduction Efforts (CARE) randomized trial of SC with or without Burch colposuspension in stress continent women with stages II-IV prolapse. Outcomes and complications were compared between obese and healthy-weight women.

      Results

      CARE participants included 74 obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2), 122 overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), and 125 healthy-weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2) women, and 1 underweight (< 18.5 kg/m2) woman. Compared to healthy-weight women, obese women were younger (59.0 ± 9.9 vs 62.1 ± 10.3 yrs; P = .04), more likely to have stage II prolapse (25.7% vs 11.2%; P = .01), and had longer operative times (189 ± 52 vs 169 ± 58 min; P = .02). Two years after surgery, stress incontinence, prolapse, symptom resolution, and satisfaction did not differ between the obese and healthy-weight groups.

      Conclusion

      Most outcomes and complication rates after SC are similar in obese and healthy-weight women.

      Key words

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