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Simulation training in the obstetrics and gynecology clerkship

      Objective

      The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of obstetrics simulator training for medical students by comparing measures of confidence in normal obstetrics skills of students with and without training.

      Study design

      After a lecture on normal labor and delivery, 33 third-year students practiced their skills either on an obstetrics simulator (n = 17) or received no further formal instruction (n = 16). All students were asked to respond to surveys of their experience and confidence in performing obstetrics procedures.

      Results

      Students who practiced deliveries on the simulator were more likely to believe that they could perform most portions of a vaginal delivery with minimal supervision or independently than were students who did not receive simulator experience. Fifteen students (88%) who received simulator experience felt that they were ready to attempt a vaginal delivery independently or with minimal supervision compared with 2 students (12.5%) who received a lecture only (P < .001).

      Conclusion

      Students who practiced deliveries on an obstetrics simulator report higher levels of confidence in their skills to perform vaginal deliveries.

      Key words

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