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Eating disorder that was diagnosed before pregnancy and pregnancy outcome

  • Charlotte Petersen Sollid
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Charlotte Petersen Sollid, Midwife, Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit Dept of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Aarhus University Hospital, DK-8200 Aarhus N, Denmark.
    Affiliations
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark,a and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, (MBC 52) King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabiab
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  • Kirsten Wisborg
    Affiliations
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark,a and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, (MBC 52) King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabiab
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  • Jakob Hjort
    Affiliations
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark,a and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, (MBC 52) King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabiab
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  • Niels Jørgen Secher
    Affiliations
    Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Perinatal Epidemiological Research Unit, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark,a and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, (MBC 52) King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabiab
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      Abstract

      Objective

      The purpose of this study was to determine the association of an eating disorder that was diagnosed before pregnancy and a preterm delivery and/or the delivery of a low-birth-weight or small-for-gestational-age infant.

      Study design

      This was a register-based follow-up study. We included 302 women who were hospitalized with an eating disorder before pregnancy who were delivered of 504 children and 900 control subjects who were delivered of 1552 children. The association of eating disorders, birth weight, and gestational age was assessed by bivariate and multivariate analyses.

      Results

      The risk of a low-birth-weight infant was twice as high in women with a previous eating disorder compared with women with no such disorder (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.2). The risk of preterm delivery and a small-for-gestational-age infant was increased to 70% and 80% (odds ratio, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.1-2.6]; odds ratio, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.3-2.4]), respectively.

      Conclusion

      Women who were hospitalized for an eating disorder that was diagnosed before pregnancy were at increased risk of impaired pregnancy outcome.

      Keywords

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