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The G-spot: A modern gynecologic myth

      To the Editors:

      As the two researchers who named the sensitive area felt through the anterior vaginal wall halfway between the back of the pubic bone and the cervix, along the course of the urethra, the “Gräfenberg spot,” we felt we should respond to Terence M. Hines' poorly researched article “The G-spot: A modern gynecologic myth.”
      • Hines TM
      The G-spot: a modern gynecologic myth.
      Unfortunately the article is based on only 24 of the more than 250 peer-reviewed research publications concerning the Gräfenberg spot and female ejaculation. It also ignores the research concerned with the adaptive significance of this sensitive area.
      Our purpose in conducting the original research published in peer-reviewed journals in the early 1980s
      • Addiego J
      • Belzer EG
      • Comolli J
      • Moger W
      • Perry JD
      • Whipple B
      Female ejaculation: a case study.
      • Perry JD
      • Whipple B
      Pelvic muscle strength of female ejaculators: evidence in support of a new theory of orgasm.
      was to validate and find a scientific explanation for the reported experiences of many women, not to create new goals. These were women who did not fit into the monolithic clitoral-centric model of sexual response, that is, they reported vaginal sensitivity and orgasm from vaginal stimulation and in some cases an expulsion of fluid that was not urine from the urethra. By saying that the Gräfenberg spot is a myth, Hines has now contributed to denying women's sexual response and pleasurable experiences.
      In our research, we first established that the Gräfenberg spot was a “sexologic” reality, that is, a concept that many women found useful to describe their personal experiences. The second research question concerned the underlying anatomic reality for this experience. Skene's glands, the paraurethral glands, which have often been called the “female prostate” throughout history, emerged as the anatomic basis for the experiences of these women (see Zaviacic,
      • Zaviacic M
      The human female prostate: from vestigial Skene's paraurethral glands and ducts to woman's functional prostate.
      1999, more than 250 references).
      Hines may want to review Whipple and Komisaruk
      • Whipple B
      • Komisaruk BR
      The G spot, orgasm, and female ejaculation: are they related?.
      (1991) (52 references), and other studies published since that time. It is our hope that Hines and your readers will not do a disservice to the multitude of women who do enjoy stimulation of the area called the Gräfenberg spot or who expel a fluid from the urethra that is different from urine. We hope that physicians will listen to the reports of their patients, review the literature, and base their judgments on scientific data, not on a biased interpretation of less than 10% of the published literature.

      References

        • Hines TM
        The G-spot: a modern gynecologic myth.
        Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001; 185: 359-362
        • Addiego J
        • Belzer EG
        • Comolli J
        • Moger W
        • Perry JD
        • Whipple B
        Female ejaculation: a case study.
        J Sex Res. 1981; 17: 13-21
        • Perry JD
        • Whipple B
        Pelvic muscle strength of female ejaculators: evidence in support of a new theory of orgasm.
        J Sex Res. 1981; 17: 22-39
        • Zaviacic M
        The human female prostate: from vestigial Skene's paraurethral glands and ducts to woman's functional prostate.
        Slovak Academic Press, Bratislava1999
        • Whipple B
        • Komisaruk BR
        The G spot, orgasm, and female ejaculation: are they related?.
        in: Proceedings of the First International Conference on Orgasm. VRP Publishers, Bombay (India)1991: 227-237