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Effectiveness of hospital-based postpartum procedures on pertussis vaccination among postpartum women

Published:October 04, 2013DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajog.2013.09.043

      Objective

      Pertussis causes significant morbidity among adults, children, and especially infants. Since 2006, pertussis vaccination has been recommended for women after delivery. We conducted a prospective, controlled evaluation of in-hospital postpartum pertussis vaccination of birth mothers from October 2009 through July 2010 to evaluate the effectiveness of hospital-based procedures in increasing postpartum vaccination.

      Study Design

      The intervention and comparison hospitals are private community facilities, each with 2000-6000 births/year. At the intervention hospital, physician opt-in orders for tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap) before discharge were implemented in November 2009, followed by standing orders in February 2010. The comparison hospital maintained standard practice. Randomly selected hospital charts of women after delivery were reviewed for receipt of Tdap and demographic data. We evaluated postpartum Tdap vaccination rates and conducted multivariate analyses to evaluate characteristics that are associated with vaccination. We reviewed 1264 charts (658 intervention hospital; 606 comparison hospital) from women with completed deliveries.

      Results

      Tdap postpartum vaccination was 0% at both hospitals at baseline. In the intervention hospital, the introduction of the opt-in order was followed by an increase in postpartum vaccination to 18%. The introduction of the standing order approach was followed by a further increase to 69% (P < .0001). No postpartum Tdap vaccinations were documented in the comparison hospital. Postpartum Tdap vaccination in the intervention hospital did not differ by demographic characteristics.

      Conclusion

      In-hospital ordering procedures substantially increased Tdap vaccination coverage in women after delivery. Opt-in orders increased coverage that increased substantially with standing orders.

      Key words

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