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Resident attrition in obstetrics and gynecology

  • Author Footnotes
    a From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Vicki L. Seltzer
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Vicki Seltzer, MD, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Queens Hospital Center, 82-68 164th St., Jamaica, NY 11432.
    Footnotes
    a From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
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  • Author Footnotes
    b From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    Robert H. Messer
    Footnotes
    b From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
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  • Author Footnotes
    c From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas Tech University, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    R. DeAnne Nehra
    Footnotes
    c From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas Tech University, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
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  • Author Footnotes
    a From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    b From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Long Island Campus for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
    c From the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Texas Tech University, Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology.
      This paper is only available as a PDF. To read, Please Download here.
      Objective: Our goal was to determine the rate of attrition from obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.
      Study Design: The Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology sent questionnaires to all 295 obstetrics and gynecology residency program directors in the United States and Canada. These programs represent 4306 postgraduate-year 1 through 4 (or 5) resident positions each year. The program directors were asked the number of residents who left voluntarily or were dismissed in a 2-year period and the reasons they left.
      Results: In a 2-year period 299 residents left or were dismissed (6.94% over 2 years, or 3.47% per year). Only 88 (1% per year) left specifically because they decided they preferred a different discipline.
      Conclusion: The rate of attrition from obstetrics and gynecology residency programs is not excessively high.

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