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The use of intravenous pancuronium bromide to produce fetal paralysis during intravascular transfusion

  • Joshua A. Copel
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Joshua A. Copel, MD, Section on Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar St., P. O. Box 3333, New Haven, CT 06510.
    Footnotes
    Affiliations
    Section on Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.

    the Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.
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  • Peter A. Grannum
    Affiliations
    Section on Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.

    the Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.
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  • Deborah Harrison
    Affiliations
    Section on Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.

    the Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.
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  • John C. Hobbins
    Affiliations
    Section on Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.

    the Department of Anesthesiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut USA.
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  • Author Footnotes
    1 Dr. Copel is a Kennedy-Dannreuther Foundation Fellow of the American Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Foundation.
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      Abstract

      Intravascular fetal transfusion can be complicated by difficulty in maintaining vascular access because of fetal movements. Treatment by intramuscular pancuronium bromide has been proposed as a means of arresting fetal movements, although this treatment requires a separate puncture for injection. We report in this article our experience with intravenous fetal injection of pancuronium bromide to produce muscular paralysis during fetal transfusion.

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