Advertisement

Hydatidiform mole: Cytogenetic marker analysis in twin gestation

Report of two cases
  • Lars O. Vejerslev
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Lars O. Vejerslev, M.D., Department of Medical Genetics, John F. Kennedy Institute, GL.Landevej 7, DK-2600 Glostrup, Denmark.
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Genetics, John F. Kennedy Institute, Glostrup, Denmark

    the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Randers County Hospital Glostrup, Denmark

    the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Horsens Hospital Glostrup, Denmark
    Search for articles by this author
  • M. Dueholm
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Genetics, John F. Kennedy Institute, Glostrup, Denmark

    the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Randers County Hospital Glostrup, Denmark

    the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Horsens Hospital Glostrup, Denmark
    Search for articles by this author
  • F.Hassing Nielsen
    Affiliations
    Department of Medical Genetics, John F. Kennedy Institute, Glostrup, Denmark

    the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Randers County Hospital Glostrup, Denmark

    the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Horsens Hospital Glostrup, Denmark
    Search for articles by this author
      This paper is only available as a PDF. To read, Please Download here.

      Abstract

      A hydatidiform mole associated with a fetus proved to be the result of twin gestation. On microscopic examination of the placenta the case was classified as a partial hydatidiform mole. Chromosomal markers were, however, consistent with a normal conception and a mole of diploid androgenetic origin. Chromosome analysis of a morphologic complete molar specimen yielded two cell lines, one consistent with a normal conception and one with diploid andibgenesis. Twinning in molar specimens must therefore be considered, regardless of macroscopic appearance. The prenatal diagnosis of a coexisting fetus and molar placenta poses a real clinical problem; analyses must distinguish between a partial mole plus a triploid fetus and a normal fetus occurring with a pertial or a complete mole. The distinction is important for decisions made during pregnancy and may be of prognostic significance after termination. The usefulness of chromosome marker analysis in distinguishing between the various origins is pointed out, and it is suggested that twin pregnancy with hydatidiform mole is more frequent than its description in the literature would suggest.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Blanc B
        • Papahadji M
        • Maresca C
        Une observation de grossesse gémellaire avec un oeuf môlaire.
        Bulletin de la Société Nationale de Gynécologie et D'Obstétrique de France. 1970; 22: 511-513
        • Honda J
        • Ikara S
        • Sarto E
        • Namoto K
        • Fukushima T
        Hydatidiform mole concurrent with normal pregnancy (twins) following clomiphene therapy.
        Acta Obstet Gynaecol Jpn. 1980; 32: 2041-2043
        • Sauerbrei EE
        • Salem S
        • Fayle B
        Coexistent hydatidiform mole and live fetus in the second trimester.
        Radiology. 1980; 135: 415-417
        • Block MF
        • Merrill JA
        Hydatidiform mole with coexistent fetus.
        Obstet Gynecol. 1982; 60: 129-134
        • Fisher RA
        • Sheppard DM
        • Lawler SD
        Twin pregnancy with complete hydatidiform mole (46,XX) and fetus (46,XY): genetic origin proved by analysis of chromosome polymorphisms.
        Br Med J. 1982; 284: 1218-1220
        • Teng NNH
        • Ballon SC
        Partial hydatidiform mole with diploid karyotype: report of three cases.
        Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1984; 150: 961-964
        • Crooij MJ
        • Van der Harten JJ
        • Puyenbroek JL
        • et al.
        A partial hydatidiform mole, dispersed throughout the placenta, coexisting with a normal living fetus.
        Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1985; 92: 104-106
        • World Health Organization
        Gestational trophoblastic diseases.
        Technical report series. 1983;
        • Vejerslev LO
        • Mogensen B
        • Olsen S
        Hydatidiform mole in a Danish material.
        Acta Radiol Oncol. 1984; 23: 97-102
        • Vejerslev LO
        • Tommerup N
        • Hallberg A
        Hydatidiform moles: methods for culture and cytogenetic analyses.
        Cancer Genet Cytogenet. 1986; 22: 19-27
        • Uchida IA
        • Freeman VCP
        • Gedeon M
        • et al.
        Twinning rate in spontaneous abortions.
        Am J Hum Genet. 1983; 35: 987-993
        • Landy HJ
        • Keith L
        • Keith D
        The vanishing twin.
        Acta Genet Med Gemellol. 1982; 31: 179-194
        • Vassilakos P
        • Riotton G
        • Kajii T
        Hydatidiform mole: two entities.
        Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1977; 127: 167-170
        • Szulman AE
        • Ma H-K
        • Wong LC
        • et al.
        Residual trophoblastic disease in association with partial hydatidiform mole.
        Obstet Gynecol. 1981; 57: 392-394