Advertisement

Transient ventricular dysfunction associated with cesarean section in a patient with hyperthyroidism

  • Steven L. Clark
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Dr. Steven L. Clark, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California, LAC/USC Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90033.
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles, California, USA

    Women's Hospital, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center Los Angeles, California, USA.
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jeffrey P. Phelan
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles, California, USA

    Women's Hospital, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center Los Angeles, California, USA.
    Search for articles by this author
  • Martin Montoro
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles, California, USA

    Women's Hospital, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center Los Angeles, California, USA.
    Search for articles by this author
  • Jorge Mestman
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Southern California School of Medicine Los Angeles, California, USA

    Women's Hospital, Los Angeles County/University of Southern California Medical Center Los Angeles, California, USA.
    Search for articles by this author
      This paper is only available as a PDF. To read, Please Download here.

      Abstract

      Pulmonary artery catheterization was performed prior to surgery in a severely hyperthyroid patient undergoing cesarean section. A transient but significant decline in left ventricular performance was observed in conjunction with the stress of operation. A parallel is suggested between this phenomenon and the documented exercise-induced reduction of left ventricular function in nonpregnant hyperthyroid patients.

      Keywords

      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Reynolds JL
        • Woody HB
        Thyrotoxic mitral regurgitation.
        Am J Dis Child. 1971; 122: 544
        • Forfar JC
        • Muir AL
        • Sawers SA
        • Toft AD
        Abnormal left ventricular function in hyperthyroidism: evidence for a possible reversible cardiomyopathy.
        N Engl J Med. 1982; 307: 1165