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The impact of laparoscopy on tubal sterilization in United States hospitals, 1970 and 1975 to 1978

  • Herbert B. Peterson
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Herbert B. Peterson, M.D., Epidemiologic Studies Branch, Family Planning Evaluation Division, Center for Health Promotion and Education, Department of Health and Human Services, Atlanta, Georgia 30333
    Affiliations
    Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Health Promotion and Eduction, Family Planning Evaluation Division Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • Joel R. Greenspan
    Affiliations
    Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Health Promotion and Eduction, Family Planning Evaluation Division Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • Frank DeStefano
    Affiliations
    Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Health Promotion and Eduction, Family Planning Evaluation Division Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • Howard W. Ory
    Affiliations
    Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Health Promotion and Eduction, Family Planning Evaluation Division Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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  • Peter M. Layde
    Affiliations
    Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control, Center for Health Promotion and Eduction, Family Planning Evaluation Division Atlanta, Georgia, USA
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      Abstract

      During the 1970s, tubal sterilization became an important method of fertility control in the United States. Over the same period laparoscopy emerged as an important innovation, one that has been associated with both a shift from postpartum to interval sterilization and a dramatic decrease in length of hospital stay required for sterilization. The use of laparoscopy has also been associated with an increase in hospital-based outpatient sterilization, particularly in the West. The number of sterilizations performed in hospitals and the use of laparoscopy for interval sterilization in hospitals both appear to have peaked. The laparoscope is an example of a technologic advance that has reduced medical care costs.
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      References

        • Center for Disease Control
        Surgical Sterilization Surveillance: Tubal Sterilization, 1970–1975. July, 1979;
        • Center for Disease Control
        Surgical Sterilization Surveillance: Tubal Sterilization, 1976–1978. March, 1981;
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        Utilization of Short-stay Hospitals, United States. 1978; (Vital and Health Statistics. Series 13, No. 46)
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