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Uterine and peripheral blood concentrations of human chorionic gonadotropin and human placental lactogen

  • John P. Gusdon Jr.
    Correspondence
    Reprint requests: Dr. John P. Gusdon, Jr., Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 300 S. Hawthrone Road, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA

    Medical College of Virginia, Department of Pharmacology, Division of Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA
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  • Larry E. Sain
    Affiliations
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, USA

    Medical College of Virginia, Department of Pharmacology, Division of Toxicology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Search for articles by this author
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      Abstract

      One hypothesis is that two placental protein hormones (human placental lactogen and human chorionic gonadotropin) are effective immunosuppressive agents that prevent the rejection of a fetus because of their very high concentrations. In patients undergoing elective repeat cesarean sections at term, we measured the concentrations of these hormones in blood obtained simultaneously from draining ovarian veins and peripheral veins, and found no significant differences.
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