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Serum albumin fractions of different solubility and their relation to cancer

  • H. Kahn
    Footnotes
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    the Chicago Lying-in Hospital Chicago, Ill. USA
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  • M.E. Hanke
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    the Chicago Lying-in Hospital Chicago, Ill. USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Wm.J. Dieckmann
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    the Chicago Lying-in Hospital Chicago, Ill. USA
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  • R.E. Pottinger
    Affiliations
    Department of Biochemistry of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of the University of Chicago Chicago, Ill. USA

    the Chicago Lying-in Hospital Chicago, Ill. USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Author Footnotes
    ∗∗ Present address, 30 N. Michigan Ave., S. 428, Chicago 2, Ill.
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      Abstract

      • 1.
        1. A method is described in which the more soluble albumin fraction is extracted with a 38.5 Gm. per cent ammonium sulfate solution from the serum proteins precipitated on a strip of filter paper. The total albumin was estimated by extraction of serum absorbed on a filter strip with a 31 Gm. per cent ammonium sulfate solution. The protein concentration in the extracts was measured turbidimetrically. On the average 100 ml. of normal serum contained 1.13 Gm. of the more soluble albumin fraction which represents about 25 per cent of the total albumin.
      • 2.
        2. The values for the more soluble albumin fraction, expressed as S = per cent of average values in normal sera, and the values for total albumin, expressed as T = per cent of average normal total albumin, were measured in 464 nonmalignancies and 82 malignancies. In addition S alone (without T) was determined in 320 nonmalignancies and 157 malignancies.
      • 3.
        3. For correlation with cancer diagnosis, S values were classified in two ways: first as high and low with respect to an intermediate zone which bears no relation to T, later as high and low with respect to a curve (Fig. 1) which represents the mean of the averages of S values in nonmalignancies and in malignancies for each T. The advantages of the later classification are pointed out. On the average the S values were 23 per cent lower in the sera from malignancies. Evaluation of the individual sera with the curve of means (Fig. 1) was correct in 89 per cent of the malignancies and in 77 per cent of the nonmalignancies. The correlation with the clinical evaluation of the success of treatment of gynecological carcinomas was correct in 98 per cent of the recurrences, and in 67 per cent of the nonrecurrences.
      • 4.
        4. During pregnancy S and T values decrease with the duration of gestation, in the last trimester they become indistinguishable from those of malignancies.
      • 5.
        5. Results from more recent studies indicate that the serological evaluation can be improved by a correction for the variations in the total protein/total albumin ratio.
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